SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

Postby Guest » Wed Jan 22, 2014 12:48 pm

A supernova has gone off in M82, a nearby irregular galaxy in Ursa Major. Various observers last night reported the supernova at about magnitude 11.5 with a color on the orange side of white.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observin ... 77661.html

http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronom ... rnova.html

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/maps-faculty/maps- ... n/maps1405

A very nice sequence of images: http://www.k-itagaki.jp/psn-m82.jpg

Link to image: http://meineko.sakura.ne.jp/ccd/PSN_J09 ... 940260.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Guest
 

Re: SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

Postby Guest » Thu Jan 23, 2014 1:25 pm

Guest
 

Re: SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

Postby Guest » Thu Jan 23, 2014 5:13 pm

Latest photo of SN 2014J

Image

Photo by Adam Block/Mount Lemmon SkyCenter/University of Arizona
Guest
 

Re: SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

Postby stephen-jones » Sun Jan 26, 2014 12:43 pm

Saw it in my 10" from the site on Friday. Quite conspicuous. You guys ought to check it out.

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk
-Stephen Jones
VSIG Moderator
User avatar
stephen-jones
 
Posts: 151
Joined: Wed Jul 17, 2013 7:59 am

Re: SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

Postby rene-gedaly » Sun Jan 26, 2014 5:42 pm

Too cloudy at site Saturday :( A number of us tried then and will try again soon.
Rene Scandone Gedaly, Forum Moderator
Membership Chair, Texas 45-Visual, Observatory Trainer
User avatar
rene-gedaly
 
Posts: 482
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:30 pm

Re: SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

Postby rene-gedaly » Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:57 am

I haven't seen the super nova yet but recall being able to see M82 (and M81) in 10x50 binoculars. Here's an article with sketch that shows what the galaxies look like in binoculars: http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=2622. With all the beautiful pictures, it's easy to lose sight of what we can actually see--was that a pun? I'll try again with a 90mm refractor later tonight from my front yard. Not much later because the clouds are coming in. Also, I have read that the SN is easier to see than the galaxy itself due to low surface brightness. Hmm, but can't be that low since M81, M82 are relatively easy to spot with a bit of experience using binoculars. Good luck, everyone!
Rene Scandone Gedaly, Forum Moderator
Membership Chair, Texas 45-Visual, Observatory Trainer
User avatar
rene-gedaly
 
Posts: 482
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:30 pm

Re: SUPERNOVA ALERT! M82

Postby rene-gedaly » Thu Jan 30, 2014 12:57 am

I haven't seen the super nova yet but recall being able to see M82 (and M81) in 10x50 binoculars. Here's an article with sketch that shows what the galaxies look like in binoculars: http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=2622. With all the beautiful pictures, it's easy to lose sight of what we can actually see--was that a pun? I'll try again with a 90mm refractor later tonight from my front yard. Not much later because the clouds are coming in. Also, I have read that the SN is easier to see than the galaxy itself due to low surface brightness. Hmm, but can't be that low since M81, M82 are relatively easy to spot with a bit of experience using binoculars. Good luck, everyone!
Rene Scandone Gedaly, Forum Moderator
Membership Chair, Texas 45-Visual, Observatory Trainer
User avatar
rene-gedaly
 
Posts: 482
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2012 1:30 pm


Return to Latest Space News

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron